December 13, 2011

My Fascination with BOKEH!




Untouched...  @ the marina.. BOSTON~




Bokeh... 
In photographybokeh (Originally play /ˈbkɛ/,[1] play /ˈbk/ boh-kay, and also sometimes heard as play /ˈbkə/ boh-kə,[2] Japanese: [boke]) is the blur,[3][4] or the aesthetic quality of the blur,[5][6][7] in out-of-focus areas of an image, or "the way the lens renders out-of-focus points of light."[8] Differences in lens aberrations and aperture shape cause some lens designs to blur the image in a way that is pleasing to the eye, while others produce blurring that is unpleasant or distracting—"good" and "bad" bokeh, respectively.[3] Bokeh occurs for parts of the scene that lie outside the depth of field. Photographers sometimes deliberately use a shallow focus technique to create images with prominent out-of-focus regions. <<< Excerpt from WIKIPEDIA... {copyrighted}


As long as I have known photography, I have seemed to have such affinity for this treat! It makes that outta focus create such a palatable view on a picture...


I am always looking for 'a' way to justify IT in my shots... and I love the way it looks.. Gives the shot a certain sense of smoothness and it warms the image beautifully...


For those who follow, here is a tip on how to accomplish this amazing effect...


Open the Aperture –You are going to want to use the widest aperture you can set your lens to (usually in the range of f/3.5 to f/5.6). This will help you achieve the bokeh effect with your background and keep the center of focus firmly on your subject with the Extend Kit Lens to Longest Tele – Most popular kit lenses are somewhere in the 18mm to 70mm range (Nikon’s 18-70mm or Canon’s 18-55mm for example) and you’re usually going to want to extend it out as far as it goes. This will eliminate the distortion you sometimes get shooting portraits at a wide angle as well as help you get that bokeh effect in your background (in combination with the other tactics listed here) & remember to Get Close – Tightly cropped is usually how you will want to shoot your portraits so get as close as you can with your extended lens if that’s the effect that you want. Getting close to your subject while your lens is extended and the aperture is wide open will also help with the bokeh effect for the background.y and play.. {for those who want to learn this technique}



I hope that you can try it.. and perhaps post some on my wall.. :)

Have FUN always!

A. Miller~